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Save 15% on the Knox Bible


In honor of the 125th Anniversary of Fr. Ronald Knox’s birth, we are offering the newly-reprinted Knox Catholic Bible for 15% off in a special promotion with Baronius Press.

In the high-ceilinged library of an English manor house one rainy day [in 1948], a bony, white-haired priest in an oversized clerical collar tapped away at a portable typewriter. From time to time he paused to knock the ashes out of his pipe against the fireplace or consult one of the fat books stacked on the massive antique table before him. At last he stood up, pulled the paper from his typewriter and closed his reference books with a ceremonious bang. His nine-year labour was finished. Monsignor Ronald Knox had completed his translation of the Catholic Bible.

Time Magazine 1948

The translation of the Bible by Ronald Knox was officially made at the request of the Bishops of England and Wales, although Knox had wanted to try his hand at updating the language of the Bible for some time.

It had been the desire of a succession of bishops for almost a 100 years to create a new Bible translation to replace the Douay Rheims edition. This Bible which had served English speaking Catholics since the time of the reformation had undergone several revisions, but was filled with archaic language, making it incomprehensible in a few places.

Originally, it was hoped that Blessed Cardinal John Henry Newman, the most famous convert to Catholicism of the 19th Century would translate the Bible, but this project was never begun. In his book, The Idea of a University, Blessed John Henry Newman pointed out the “great difficulty in combining the two necessary qualities, fidelity to the original and purity in the adopted vernacular.”

Although the Douay translation was much loved and gave many passages of Holy Scripture that are still well-known today, it was felt that the translation was too difficult to understand. A new translation would bring the gospel message to a much wider audience.

“Ronald Knox was the most original and eloquent writer of the century.”

Fr. George Rutler

“Knox was a bright star whose work was unflaggingly wise, urbane, witty and all done in the purest prose imaginable.”

Thomas Howard

 

The English bishops gave him permission to start just before World War II broke out. It was initially planned that he would report his work to a team of evaluators, but the wartime difficulty of communication made that impractical, so he worked entirely on his own. When it came out after the war, there was some predictable criticism from people who liked either the King James version or Challoner’s revision of the Douay-Rheims. Knox even wrote a small booklet to explain how he had gone about translating the Bible in order to placate the critics.

Msgr. Knox had a profound love for Sacred Scripture, a passion was to make the Bible accessible to as many people as possible … In the Knox translation, clarity is paramount.

Dr. Scott Hahn

Praiseworthy achievement … a monument of many years of patient study and toil.

Ven. Pope. Pius XII

 

Knox’s bible also received great acclaim when it was first published. Time magazine called Knox the “man who made the great 20th century bible.”

Even the Archbishop of Canterbury of the time recommended it, and it became the preferred translation of Fulton Sheen. The Bishops were so pleased with the completed version that it was authorized for liturgical use, and the Knox translation of the Bible was used as the official version in the churches of Great Britain, Ireland and Australia for the decade leading up to Vatican II – and the first version sanctioned for liturgical use in England and Wales.

Get the Knox Bible for 15% off.

This is a limited time offer that ends on 2/21/13.

The Knox Bible is the ideal translation for those looking to deepen their understanding of the Holy Scriptures. It was hailed as the finest translation of the 20th Century, approved for liturgical use and was endorsed by Pope Pius XII, Archbishop Fulton Sheen and many more.

In the early 20th century, Msgr. Ronald Knox embarked on an entirely new English Bible. He wanted a Bible that did not merely translate the original but made it read as if an Englishman had written it. His translation is spiritual and literary, graceful and lyrical, making it one of the most beautiful vernacular versions of the Holy Bible.

OREMUS – Westminster Cathedral Magazine (Dec 2012 Edition, Number 176)

“Ronald Knox’s translation of the Bible has for too long been a forgotten masterpiece of twentieth-century English Catholicism. It is a last flourishing of that hundred years, the Second Spring, that produced so many great Catholic writers: Newman, Chesterton, Greene, Waugh and many others.”

Supremacy and Survival: The English Reformation

I think Knox achieved what he set as his goal in the Epistles; he comments on the length of St. Paul’s sentences and he manages that length well, bringing clarity to some difficult passage of the Epistles. This is a beautiful edition of The Holy Bible and one I look forward to using in my devotions for the Year of Faith!

The unique features of the Knox Bible are:

  • Translated from the Latin Vulgate and compared with the Greek and Hebrew texts single handedly by Ronald Knox over nine years.
  • Uses timeless English, which is both sacral and reverent.
  • Set in a single-column format with verse references placed at the side of the text in order to provide a clear and easily readable Bible.
  • The full Bible is now available again for the first time in over 50 years, in an edition from Baronius Press, beautifully bound in leather with gilt edges.
  • Included with this new edition is a paperback edition of On Englishing the Bible (5.5″ x 8″, 72 pages) in which Msgr. Knox describes his account of the ordeal, which manages to be both illuminating and full of his wit. Anyone wishing to know more about Knox’s translation – and the problems involved in rendering the sacred Scriptures into the vernacular – will be fascinated to hear from the translator himself how he tackled this mammoth project.

Download PDF Sample Page

Point size vs. x-Height

  • The point size of a typeface (Font Size) is a measure of its overall height, from the top of the tallest character above the baseline to the longest descender below the baseline.
  • x-Height refers to the distance between the baseline that letter sits on and the top of the lower case x (the source of the term) and mid-section of lower case letters

The x-height is what really makes a difference to readability, not font size.

 

Get the Knox Bible for 15% off.

This is a limited time offer that ends on 2/21/13.

C. S. Lewis called him “the wittiest man in Europe,” and Ronald Knox was a deft apologist, an astute translator of the Bible, and the preacher for occasions great and small throughout the first half of the twentieth century in England.

Born in 1888, as the sixth child of the Anglican Bishop of Manchester, he grew up in what he called “that form of Protestant piety which the modern world half regrets, half derides as ‘old-fashioned.’” By the time he was 12 he was already writing Latin poetry.

Having won almost every attainable honour at Oxford, at just 24, Knox became the Anglican chaplain of Oxford’s Trinity College. While he seemed to be content with preaching, talking, and writing, his soul was not at peace.

Five years later, in 1917, Ronald Knox resigned and entered the Roman Catholic Church. “Authority played a large part in my belief,” he said later. In Knox’s case, his break with the Church of England also meant a permanent break with his father, who had previously regarded him as his favourite son.

Knox was ordained to the priesthood, and soon he was back at Oxford, this time as a Catholic chaplain. Father Knox for 13 years made his rooms a gathering place for the university’s most glittering wits. While he was there, he began churning out acclaimed and smoothly written detective novels (six within ten years) such as ‘The Body in the Silo’ and ‘The Viaduct Murder’, which helped supplement his modest chaplaincy funds.

Towards the end of his chaplaincy at Oxford in 1939, Evelyn Waugh recounted that Knox was at a low ebb. At that point the English hierarchy commissioned Knox to single-handedly translate the New Testament.  From the beginning Knox assumed he would complete the entire Bible, which led to misunderstandings with the hierarchy, which were magnified by some opposition to the translation as it progressed. To complete the arduous task, Knox accepted the offer of the young converts, Lord and Lady Aston to retreat to their tranquil country hall, Aldenham Park.

There, with hands on his trusted typewriter and pipe in mouth, he produced on average twenty-four translated verses a day. He would not emerge until nine years later, when finally in the Autumn of 1948, the final verses were completed.

Knox’s bible received great acclaim when it was first published. Time magazine called Knox the “man who made the great 20th century bible.”

Knox died in 1957 with many high honours attached to his name, having become a Fellow of both Trinity and Balliol colleges, and a Protonotary Apostolic to Pope Pius XII.

© Ian King, Flickr

Get the Knox Bible for 15% off.

This is a limited time offer that ends on 2/21/13.

 

 

 

 

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