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Favorite Chesterton Quotes

by Ian on June 16, 2011

G. K. Chesterton: The Apostle of Common Sense

G. K. Chesterton: The Apostle of Common Sense

We recently held a drawing on Facebook for a free signed copy of The Apostle of Common Sense. We asked people to tell us there favorite Chesterton quotes to enter. Here is a list of what people submitted:

  • It only takes common sense to make good decisions
  • Fallacies do not cease to be fallacies because they become fashions.
  • A dead thing can go with the stream, but only a living thing can go against it.
  • The way to love anything is to realize that it may be lost.
  • If there were no God, there would be no Atheists.
  • Drink because you are happy, but never because you are miserable. Never drink when you are wretched without it, or you will be like the grey-faced gin-drinker in the slum; but drink when you would be happy without it, and you will be like the laughing peasant of Italy. Never drink because you need it, for this is rational drinking, and the way to death and hell. But drink because you do not need it, for this is irrational drinking, and the ancient health of the world.
  • Art like morality consists in drawing the line somewhere.
  • He has permitted the twilight.
  • Bringing an open mind to the Catholic Church is like bringing an iron to a magnate.
  • Dim drums throbbing, in the hills half heard,
    Where only on a nameless throne a crownless prince has stirred,
    Where, risen from a doubtful seat and half attained stall,
    The last knight of Europe takes weapons from the wall,...
  • A woman’s function is laborious, but because it is gigantic, not because it is minute. I will pity Mrs. Jones for the hugeness of her task; I will never pity her for its smallness.
  • Without education, we are in a horrible and deadly danger of taking educated people seriously.
  • The Christian ideal has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and left untried.
  • Man is more himself, man is more manlike, when joy is the fundamental thing in him, and grief the superficial. Melancholy should be an innocent interlude, a tender and fugitive frame of mind; praise should be the permanent pulsation of the soul. Pessimism is at best an emotional half-holiday; joy is the ...uproarious labour by which all things live.
  • All art is born when the temporary touches the eternal.
  • There are no uninteresting things, only uninterested people.
  • The Bible tells us to love our neighbors, and also to love our enemies; probably because they are generally the same people.
  • A woman uses her intelligence to find reasons to support her intuition.
  • In prosperity, our friends know us. In adversity, we know our friends.
  • America is the only nation in the world that is founded on a creed. That creed is set forth in the Declaration of Independence; perhaps the only piece of practical politics that is also great literature.
  • Literature is a luxury. Fiction is a necessity.
  • A teacher who is not dogmatic is simply a teacher who is not teaching.
  • A room without books is like a body without a soul.
  • They say that any stick is good enough to beat a dog with; but did anyone ever try to beat a dog with a stick of asparagus?
  • AMONG the rich you will never find a really generous man even by accident. They may give their money away, but they will never give themselves away; they are egotistic, secretive, dry as old bones. To be smart enough to get all that money you must be dull enough to want it.
  • The traveler sees what he sees, the tourist sees what he has come to see.
  • Just going to church doesn't make you a Christian any more than standing in your garage makes you a car.
  • The most astonishing thing about miracles is that they happen.

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