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German Sacred Architecture

I would imagine that when people think of German sacred architecture, they would think of gothic spires and arches soaring above them.  While this is a main theme in Germany, not every church in the country is like this.  This is the exact case in Berlin.  As an overall city, Berlin is extremely modern and does not show very many traces of its checkered past under the Third Reich or the Soviets.  Even the Reichstag, the seat of the lower house of the German Parliament, lacks its old dome and instead has an modern glass dome crowning it.  The same is true for the Catholic cathedral in the city.  The original cathedral was built in the 18th century but was destroyed during the bombing of Berlin in WWII.  The church was rebuilt to appear on the outside like the old church, but the inside is clearly modern.  The interesting thing about the church is that while it is definitely modern, there is subtle meaning to much of the design.  Try examining my picture to see what I mean.

In Munich, the Cathedral of Our Lady (Frauenkirch) suffered severe damage during the war.  Much of the nave and one of the towers of the church were damaged by bombs.  The church was restored, but it did suffer some permanent damage because several of the massive stained glass windows were destroyed in the bombing and new, more plain and modern stained glass took their place.  The church retains the original windows in the apse behind the altar.  These windows concentrate on Mary and her relationship with Christ.  The central window appears to depict the Joyful Mysteries of the Rosary.

The answers to my last blog are:

Basilica di San Nicola – Bari, Italy:  This is an image in the lower church looking into the altar in which the relics of Saint Nicholas are kept.
Basilica of Saint Andrew – Patras, Greece:  This is an image taken of the apse of the church in the altar area.  Mary is an overwhelming figure.

Hedwig

Annunciation

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